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Safety training and worker induction for asbestos-related work

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It is essential that workers know how to identify and work safely with asbestos. The information below will assist tradesman employers (such as plumbers and electricians) induct and provide a level of safety training to their workers doing asbestos-related work and small amounts of non-licensed asbestos removal (up to 10 metres squared).

Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) may choose to use the materials with other training materials when delivering asbestos safety training to:

  • vocational education students, apprentices and trade students in the building, construction, plumbing, and electrical trades
  • participants in the Queensland Building and Construction Commission (QBCC) approved managerial course (BSATMC001).

Please note: The following training outline does NOT substitute the necessary licensing training requirements for non-friable asbestos removal of greater than 10 square metres or any friable asbestos removal. A person conducting a business or undertaking removing any amount of friable asbestos (material that contains asbestos and is in a powder form or that can be crumbled, pulverised or reduced to a powder by hand pressure when dry) or removing more than ten square metres of non-friable asbestos must be licenced.

Find out more about licensing training requirements.

Training outline

Component 1: What is asbestos?

Asbestos materials were used commonly in the building industry between the 1940s and late 1980s. The objectives of this component are to guide users to understand:

  • what asbestos is and its properties
  • what types of building products contain asbestos
  • the common locations where asbestos can be found in domestic and commercial buildings.

Use the following web links to better understand where asbestos was used and why.

There are three PDF diagrams that will show you where some of the common locations of asbestos materials in typical domestic and commercial buildings:

The following two films should help you better identify asbestos containing materials:

Outcomes:

You should now:

  • understand the types of products to be aware of in your daily work, whether visiting domestic or commercial buildings
  • be able to adequately identify asbestos containing materials or assume which materials could contain asbestos
  • know where to send a sample to determine whether it is asbestos.

Component 2: Asbestos and your health

The objectives of this component are to understand the risks of exposure to asbestos fibres and the potential health effects that could affect you, your work colleagues or your clients. While many asbestos-related diseases may not manifest themselves for 20-50 years, there are cases where young and middle-aged people also suffer from an asbestos-related disease.

Read the following content and download the PDF for more information.

Outcomes:

You should now:

  • know about the diseases than can result from exposure to airborne asbestos fibres
  • understand the factors that increase the risk of exposure to asbestos
  • know how to be responsible when it comes to asbestos and avoid exposure to yourself, your work colleagues and any clients.

Component 3: Safe work procedures

It is important that safe work procedures are used when carrying out asbestos work or asbestos-related work to prevent fibres from becoming airborne.

The objectives of this component are to:

  • ensure you know how to use safe work procedures
  • always use personal protective equipment when doing asbestos-related work
  • always ensure that you protect your clients by properly cleaning up the work area after job completion.

For more information on how you can work safely with asbestos read the following content or download the PDFs.

Outcomes:

You should now:

  • understand suitable control measures for the kinds of tasks that you perform at work to avoid exposure to asbestos fibres
  • know how to avoid incorrect practices
  • know how to safely handle and dispose of asbestos containing materials
  • be able to set up a perimeter to restrict access to the area of potential contamination.

Component 4: What does the law say you should know about asbestos before disturbing or starting work?

It is essential that workers know how to identify and work safely with asbestos. The information below will assist tradesman employers (such as plumbers and electricians) induct and provide a level of safety training to their workers doing asbestos-related work and small amounts of non-licensed asbestos removal (up to 10 metres squared).

The objectives of this component are to:

  • be aware of Queensland legislation and codes and know how to access this information
  • know how to request to view the asbestos register and management plan at a workplace building
  • know how to safely dispose of asbestos waste.

Queensland legislation and codes of practice are in place to ensure persons are not put at risk of exposure to asbestos fibres by any work activities including home renovations, maintenance or removal work both at a workplace and domestic premise.

For more information about your legal responsibilities view:

Outcomes:

You should now:

  • know when to view an asbestos register prior to work commencing
  • know when asbestos-related work becomes asbestos removal work and when air monitoring and clearance inspections are required
  • know how to lawfully and safely dispose of asbestos waste
  • know when licensed asbestos removal is required or when to use a regulated asbestos waste contractor
  • understand the kinds of prohibited activities when disturbing asbestos and avoiding using vacuum cleaners when cleaning up asbestos.

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