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Injury statistics for carpentry and joinery

The image below shows the most common injuries experienced by workers in this industry. Click on the circles to access more information about the injury statistics and practical solutions for making your workplace healthier and safer.

Depicts the most common injuries and hazards hotspots on the human body
Foot and toes
Lower leg
Hand and fingers
Back
Wrist
Eye
Shoulder
Knee
Ankle
 

 

Includes workers who construct and install structures and fixtures of wood, plywood or wallboard and cut, shape and fit timber parts to form structures and fittings.

Body part

% of total injuries

Injury type

Injury mechanism

Hazards

Hands and fingers

27%

Laceration and open wound

Using industrial guns and working with pieces or sheets of steel and metal

Sharp objects

Back

16%

Muscle and tendon sprains and strains

Lifting or carrying pieces of timber

Manual tasks

Eye

9%

Fragments of metal in eyes

Working with pieces of metal/steel, in particular when grinding or drilling

Foreign body

Knee

6%

Muscle and tendon sprains and strains

Tripping over or falling down while carrying things over poor or uneven ground surfaces or tripping over things on the ground; from stepping off of ladders/forklifts/slabs/beams; and from squatting down to complete tasks

Slips, trips and falls

Shoulder

5%

Muscle and tendon sprains and strains

Lifting or carrying pieces of timber

Manual tasks

Ankle

4%

Muscle and tendon sprains and strains

Rolling ankle on uneven ground surfaces or stepping off of ladders/forklifts or slabs

Slips, trips and falls

Lower leg

4%

Laceration and open wound

Walking into metal/steel or from working with pieces of metal or steel

Sharp objects

Wrist

4%

Muscle and tendon sprains and strains

Particular carpal tunnel syndrome, from repetitious tasks or lifting and carrying pieces of timber

Manual tasks

Foot and toes

4%

Laceration and open wound

Stepping on nails on the ground

Sharp objects


Source: Queensland Employee Injury Database. Data current as at August 2008 and is subject to change over time. Based on accepted workers' compensation claims, excluding commuting claims, between 2000-01 and 2006-07 which resulted in a musculoskeletal injury.


Last updated 07 October 2011